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Ten Reasons to Make English the Official Language of the United States

“History has blessed [the U.S.] with all the freedom and advantages of multiculturalism.

But it has also blessed us, because of the accident of our origins, with a linguistic unity that brings a critically

needed cohesion to a nation as diverse, multiracial and multiethnic as America.

Why gratuitously throw away that priceless asset?”  

– Charles Krauthammer, Time Magazine, June 4, 2006
  1. To stipulate that although government may use other languages, to be legally binding and authoritative e.g. “official,” it must act or communicate in the English language.
  2. To clarify that whenever there is a conflict in meaning between government laws, regulations, or pronouncements issued in more than one language, the English version is the authoritative one.
  3. To clarify that unless government decides to provide it, no one has an entitlement or right to government services or documents in a language other than English.
  4. To recognize the historical fact that the United States has been an overwhelmingly English speaking nation since it was created and that its constitution and foundational documents are in English.
  5. To recognize that while the people United States value and respect diversity, they want to preserve English as their common language and therefore immigrants have the responsibility to learn English.
  6. To conform to the majority of the states (31) that already have made English their official language.
  7. To respond to the will of the American people, 87 percent of whom believe English should be our official language, according to a May 2010 Rasmussen Reports survey.
  8. To conform to the rest of the world: Eighty-five percent of the UN’s member nations have official languages. Fifty-three (53) of those nations have adopted English as their official language.
  9. To avoid the costs, burdens, and conflicts that arise in nations like Canada or international organizations like the European Union that attempt to conduct business in more than one official language.
  10. To bring the federal government into conformity with national institutions like the U.S. Army and the federal court system, who for practical reasons have decided to operate in English.
Twenty-seven of those nations, mostly in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean, have made English their only official language

 

Ten Reasons to Make English the Official Language of the Individual States

  1. To specify that although state government is permitted to use other languages for common sense reasons, to be legally binding and authoritative e.g. “official,” it must act or communicate in the English language.
  2. To clarify that if there is a conflict in meaning between state government laws, regulations, or pronouncements communicated in more than one language, the English version is the authoritative one.
  3. To clarify that unless the state provides for it in law, no one has an entitlement or right to state government services or documents in a language other than English.
  4. To protect employment rights and assure equal treatment for a state’s English-speaking citizens.
  5. To recognize the fact that the day-to-day default language of all fifty state governments, their legislatures, courts, and executive branches, is the English language.
  6. To join the great majority of the states (31) that already have made English their official language.
  7. To respond to the desire of the American people, 87 percent of whom favor making English the official language, according to a May 2010 Rasmussen Reports survey.
  8. To avoid the costs, burdens, and conflicts that afflict societies divided by language.
  9. To provide incentives for immigrants to learn English so they can assimilate, earn higher wages and pursue the American dream like generations of immigrants before them.
  10. To recognize that while the people of the United States value and respect diversity, they also want to preserve English as their common language, and their ‘Melting Pot’ heritage as a nation.
**Common sense exceptions include: protecting public health & safety, protecting the rights of criminal defendants, teaching foreign languages, promoting trade and tourism etc.

Ten Reasons to Make English the Official Language of Your County

  1. To specify that although county government is permitted to use other languages for common sense reasons, to be legally binding and authoritative e.g. “official,” it must act or communicate in the English language.
  2. To clarify that if there is a conflict in meaning between county government laws, regulations, or pronouncements communicated in more than one language, the English version is the authoritative one.
  3. To clarify that unless the county provides for it in law, no one has an entitlement or right to county government services or documents in a language other than English.
  4. To protect employment rights and assure equal treatment for a state’s English-speaking citizens.
  5. To recognize the fact that the day-to-day default language of all fifty state governments, their legislatures, courts, and executive branches, is the English language.
  6. To set an example for the entire state to join the great majority of the states (31) that already have made English their official language.
  7. To respond to the desire of the American people, 87 percent of whom favor making English the official language, according to a May 2010 Rasmussen Reports survey.
  8. To avoid the costs, burdens, and conflicts that afflict societies divided by language.
  9. To provide incentives for immigrants to learn English so they can assimilate, earn higher wages, and pursue the American dream like generations of immigrants before them.
  10. To recognize that while the people of the United States value and respect diversity, they also want to preserve English as their common language and their ‘Melting Pot’ heritage as a nation.

**Common sense exceptions include: protecting public health & safety, protecting the rights of criminal defendants, teaching foreign languages, promoting trade and tourism etc.