2013-2014 Congressional Legislation

(113th Congress)

 Introduced English Legislation

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We support… 

Representative Steve King’s H.R. 997English Language Unity Act of 2013, requires all official functions of the United States to be conducted in English, requires the establishment of a uniform language requirement for naturalization, and sets the framework for uniform testing of English language ability for candidates for naturalization.

Sen. James Inhofe’s S. 464English Language Unity Act of 2013, requires all official functions of the United States to be conducted in English, requires the establishment of a uniform language requirement for naturalization, and sets the framework for uniform testing of English language ability for candidates for naturalization. This is identical to legislation introduced in the House of Representatives as H.R. 997, by Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa).

Representative Steve Stockman’s H.R. 5473, the James Boulet National Language Act of 2014, establishes English as the official language of the federal government and repeals Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act, which mandates multilingual voter ballots for federal elections in covered jurisdictions.

We oppose…

Senator Chuck Schumer and Senator Marco Rubio’s S. 744, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013, would grant legal status to the estimated 12-20 million illegal aliens residing in the United States.  As introduced and as amended by the Senate Judiciary Committee, S. 744 does not contain any provisions establishing English as the official language of government.  It also does not require illegal aliens applying for a status adjustment and work visa to demonstrate any English language ability.

Delegate Pedro Pierluisi of Puerto Rico’s H.R. 2000 and Senator Martin Heinrich of New Mexico’s S. 2020, the Puerto Rico Status Resolution Act, which would authorize the State Elections Commission of Puerto Rico to provide for a ratification vote on the admission of Puerto Rico into the Union as a State.  The ratification vote would be comprised of the following question: ‘Do you want Puerto Rico to be admitted as a State of the United States? Yes XX or NO XX.’  The bill does not contain any provisions to require that Puerto Rico change its language policy to comply with all other 50 state governments,  from de facto Spanish to de facto English.